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2013 Trans-HHS Intimate Partner Violence Screening and Counseling: Research Symposium

Background

Picture of shadows of women's heads
  • 2013 Trans-HHS Intimate Partner Violence Screening and Counseling: Research Symposium
  • The purpose of the symposium is to identify gaps in research on screening and counseling for intimate partner violence (IPV) in primary health settings and to shape priorities for a public health research agenda moving forward. The symposium will be held on December 9, 2013 at the Neuroscience Center Building at 6001 Executive Boulevard Rockville, Maryland, 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.
  • The Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA), Section 2713 articulates a commitment to preventive services for women. Because medical providers are in a unique position to assess and provide support for women who experience interpersonal violence, the Institute of Medicine and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force have recommended that clinicians screen and counsel for IPV. Under the ACA, women covered by private health insurance no longer have to pay a cost-share for IPV screening by their clinical provider.
  • Rape, physical violence and/or stalking by an intimate partner affects more than 1 in 3 women in their lifetime, with direct effects on a woman's health. The effects are damaging, enduring, and impact the mind as well as the body. Victims do not just include the person who is abused; more than 15 million children witness family violence each year. Furthermore, interpersonal and domestic violence may lead to increased rates of chronic health conditions, including obesity, chronic pain, depression and substance abuse. Domestic violence is an issue touching individuals, families, and communities.
  • Preventing domestic violence is a stated priority of the Obama administration. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Coordinating Committee on Women's Health (CCWH), representing HHS agencies and offices throughout the Department, has identified this as a cross-federal priority focus. The Committee is hosting this symposium to facilitate the development of effective strategies to support health practitioners providing screening and counseling for IPV. The HHS Office on Women's Health, the Administration on Children and Families, and the National Institutes of Health are the lead agencies planning this symposium. The planning committee also includes representation from the Administration for Community Living; Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Health Resources and Services Administration; Indian Health Service; Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH); Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation; and OASH Office of Population Affairs.
  • You are invited to download a groundbreaking report, Trauma-informed Approaches: Federal Activities and Initiatives - the second and highly anticipated Working Document Report of the Federal Partners Committee on Women and Trauma. Completed on September 30, 2013, the report documents the projects, programs, and initiatives of more than three dozen federal agencies, departments, and offices-one of the largest interagency collaborations in federal government history. With agencies' commitment to implementing gender-responsive, trauma-informed approaches, this report addresses the growing national interest in this issue, the work of the Federal Partners Committee, and the specific progress that participating agencies have made over the past three years (2010-2013), since the Committee's publication of its first report in 2011. This new report, developed with support from SAMHSA's National Center for Trauma-Informed Care, clearly demonstrates the application of trauma-informed approaches across a wide range of settings and systems and encourages other governmental and nongovernmental agencies to implement a cross-sector, interagency, inter-systems' realization, recognition, and response to trauma.
  • Below are information resources from participating federal agencies.

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Symposium Archive

  • The Intimate Partner Violence Screening (IPV) and Counseling Research Symposium was held at NIH Neuroscience Building on Monday, December 9, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., 6001 Executive Blvd., Rockville, MD.
  • The Department of Health and Human Services Coordinating Committee on Women's Health initiated this symposium in early 2013. In addition to NIH, participating agencies includes: Administration on Aging, Administration on Children and Families (ACF), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Health Resources and Services Administration, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, and the Office on Women's Health (OWH).
  • The ultimate goal of this meeting was to identify gaps in research in screening and counseling for IPV in primary health care settings and to shape priorities in the national research agenda moving forward. Ultimately, the Department's goal is to promote effective strategies for health care practitioners for screening and counseling.
  • The specific areas covered during the symposium were:
    • Culturally-competent, comprehensive screening and counseling practices
    • Barriers to screening for IPV
    • Past and ongoing experiences of trauma
    • The intersection of IPV and substance abuse
    • Integrating screening into clinical settings
    • The effects of screening and counseling on health, safety, and outcomes related to social and emotional well-being
  • Despite the weather and the unscheduled leave for federal employees, the meeting was attended by 136 participants among them federal employees, researchers, practitioners, and advocates. In addition, 64 participants viewed the meeting via the NIH Video.
  • Symposium participants reviewed the current body of evidence on screening and counseling research for IPV across the lifespan and identified gaps in research for screening and counseling for IPV in primary health settings. In addition, the participants discussed effective IPV screening guidelines and appropriate counseling and intervention tools for health care practitioners.
  • The symposium was chaired by Dr. Nancy Lee (HHS/OWH), Dr. Marylouise Kelley (ACF), and Dr. Samia Noursi (National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIDA). Dr. Lisa Begg from the Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) played a significant role in leading the planning of this meeting.
  • Keynote speaker was Dr. Jacquelyn Campbell, Professor, Anna D. Wolf Chair, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Dr. Campbell presented on "Now that we are doing routine screening violence - what should "brief counseling" look like? - A research agenda."
  • Dr. Janine Austin Clayton, Director, ORWH, and Associate Director, Women's Health Research, NIH, provided opening remarks. Ms. Lynn Rosenthal, White House Advisor on Violence Against Women provided welcoming remarks. Among the speakers were NIH grantees, council members, program officials and scientists.
  • The symposium videocast is archived for viewing at NIH Videocast
  • Federal resources associated the symposium and intimate partner violence are available at the Women's Health Resources Portal: IPV, a joint portal from the National Library of Medicine and the Office of Research on Women's Health, NIH.
  • For additional information, please contact the NIH co-chair of this symposium, Dr. Samia Noursi, snoursi@nida.nih.gov

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National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  • The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is serving as the agency host for the December 9, 2013 IPV Research Symposium.
  • Violence Against Women - Estimates of Funding for Various Research, Condition, and Disease Categories (RCDC)
    You will note that NIH uses the term, Violence Against Women (VAW), for all of its reporting, especially for categorizing information about its research support. Below is listed the information on both FY 2011 and FY 2012, the most recent reporting periods that are available. We invite you to review these two links as there is information on the more than 105 research projects (FY 2012 report) including project abstracts, names of the primary investigator, and links for any published articles.
  • NIH created a dedicated section for VAW several years ago as part of the Women's Health Resources Portal. The link below will connect you with a great deal of updated information from the key NIH institutes and centers (ICs) that support VAW research.
  • Office of Emergency Care Research, National Institute of General Medical Sciences
    The Office of Emergency Care Research coordinates clinical research and research training for the emergency setting. After turning to family and the police, the resource most often used by abused women is the Emergency Department (ED), and so it plays a pivotal role in helping all those who are victims of intimate partner violence (IPV).
  • The National Institutes of Health have funded a large number of varied research projects that address IPV in the emergency department. For example, one study examined how adolescent drinking styles act as a mediator between childhood victimization and domestic violence. Other NIH funded work has demonstrated the need for a more rigorous classification of injuries caused by IPV to improve the quality of forensic evidence. Despite the fact that the majority of police-identified victims of IPV frequently use the ED, NIH funded studies have concluded that IPV is under-recognized in EDs, and that new system-level strategies are needed to make it easier for victims of IPV to disclose their history and access needed resources.

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health

  • Project Connect
    This program is designed to improve the health and safety of women and children. Project Connect is a national initiative to change how adolescent health, reproductive health, and Native health services respond to sexual and domestic violence.

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Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  • Divison of Family Violence Prevention
    Family Violence Prevention and Services Program
    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families
  • The Family Violence Prevention and Services Program administers the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA), the primary federal funding stream dedicated to the support of emergency shelter and related assistance for victims of domestic violence and their children. The Family Violence Prevention and Services Program is committed to:
    • Providing shelter and other supportive services for victims and their children

    • Coordinating statewide improvements within local communities, social service systems, and programming regarding the prevention and intervention of domestic violence through the leadership of State Domestic Violence Coalitions and FVPSA State Administrators

    • Increasing public awareness about the prevalence of domestic violence, dating violence and family violence

    • Supporting local and community-based domestic violence programs with specialized technical assistance addressing emerging issues such as trauma-informed care; the co-occurrence of domestic violence and child maltreatment; culturally specific domestic violence services; and effective interventions for children exposed to domestic violence
  • To accomplish this work the FVPSA Program provides grants to states, territories, tribes, state domestic violence coalitions and national resource centers.
  • Addressing the Health Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence
  • For over 16 years, FYSB's Family Violence Prevention and Services Program has funded the National Health Resource Center on Domestic Violence (HRC) which serves as the nation's clearinghouse for information on the health care response to domestic violence and provides training and technical assistance to thousands of people each year. The HRC offers model strategies and tools to health professionals and domestic violence/sexual assault (DV/SA) programs to address and prevent the chronic health issues and injuries associated with exposure to abuse.
  • Each year, the HRC trains over 4,600 providers and distributes hundreds of thousands of patient and provider education materials to over 22,000 professional nationwide as well as providing in depth individual technical assistance to over 1,500 people a year.

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Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  • The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's (AHRQ) mission is to improve the quality, safety, efficiency, and effectiveness of health care for all Americans. As 1 of 12 agencies within the Department of Health and Human Services, AHRQ supports research that helps people make more informed decisions and improves the quality of health care services.
  • AHRQ funding is used to develop research, reports, practical tools, and other resources to improve the quality, safety, effectiveness, and efficiency of health care. These resources are being used to make care safer and better for people in communities across the country.
  • AHRQ is committed to improving care safety and quality by developing successful partnerships and generating the knowledge and tools required for long-term improvement. The central goal of our research is measurable improvements in health care in America, gauged in terms of improved quality of life and patient outcomes, lives saved, and value gained for what we spend.
  • To achieve its mission, the Agency is committed to organizational excellence and the use of efficient and responsive business processes to maximize the Agency's resources and the effectiveness of its programs. Our overall focus is:
    • Safety and quality: Reduce the risk of harm by promoting delivery of the best possible health care.
    • Effectiveness: Improve health care outcomes by encouraging the use of evidence to make informed health care decisions.
    • Efficiency: Transform research into practice to facilitate wider access to effective health care services and reduce unnecessary costs.
  • Examples of AHRQ-Sponsored Systematic Reviews
  • Examples from AHRQ Innovations Exchange
    • Family Violence Prevention and Services Formula Grants to State and Territories

    • Family Violence Prevention Program Significantly Improves Ability to Identify and Facilitate Treatment for Patients Affected by Domestic Violence 7/31/2013
      Kaiser Permanente Northern California's Family Violence Prevention Program seeks to improve the identification, prevention, and treatment of domestic violence through a coordinated "systems model" approach, which includes a supportive environment that encourages disclosure of domestic violence to providers, routine screening of high-risk patients, referrals to onsite and community mental health services, and linkages to community resources.

    • Nurse Home Visits Improve Birth Outcomes, Other Health and Social Indicators for Low-Income, First-Time Mothers and Their Children 4/3/2013
      A series of home visits conducted by nurses to low-income, first-time mothers during pregnancy and throughout the child's first 2 years of life leads to improved outcomes and lower costs.

    • Home-Based Crisis Intervention Reduces Trauma Symptoms and Behavior Problems Among Children Who Witness Violence 1/9/2013
      The Summit County Children Who Witness Violence program was a collaborative effort sponsored by Akron Children's Hospital that was designed to decrease the traumatic impact of witnessing violence for children under the age of 18 years through the use of home-based trauma services.

  • Examples of Manuscripts from AHRQ-Sponsored Databases
  • Russo, C.A. (Thomson Healthcare), Owens, P.L. (AHRQ), and Hambrick, M.M. (AHRQ). Violence-Related Stays in U.S. Hospitals, 2005. HCUP Statistical Brief #48. March 2008. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. (PDF, 178 KB).
  • Recent Findings of AHRQ-Sponsored Research
    • Intimate partner violence is associated with higher health care costs.
      This study examined total health care costs for a group of women over an 11 year period and compared costs for women who experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) with those who did not. IPV resulted in $585 higher annual health care costs during the period of abuse, and these costs remained significantly higher for 3 years after the abuse ended. By the 4th year, differences were not statistically significant, and by the 5th year, costs for the IPV and non-IPV groups were similar. Fishman, Bonomi, Anderson, et al., J Gen Intern Med 25(9):920-925, 2010 (AHRQ grant HS10909).

    • Awareness of decision points shared by abused women informs counseling sessions.
      Focus groups were held with 41 women, and an additional 20 women were interviewed; all of the women were undergoing counseling for domestic violence. Researchers identified five turning points that could be used by counselors to motivate women to leave their abusers. The turning points were when (1) they realized that the violence might spill over onto children or other family members; (2) the abuse intensified so they feared for their lives; (3) they realized that support and assistance were available to them; (4) they became fatigued from continually losing hope that their situation would change; and (5) they discovered their abuser was unfaithful. Chang, Dado, Hawker, et al., J Women's Health 19(2):251-259, 2010 (AHRQ grant HS13913).

    • Young women are at highest risk for domestic violence.
      According to this study, overall rates of domestic violence are declining, but women in their mid-20s to early 30s are most vulnerable to becoming victims of abuse. Given these findings, the researchers suggest that women in this vulnerable age group who use college health clinics, family planning services, or obstetrical services be screened for domestic violence. Rivara, Anderson, Fishman, et al., Violence Vict 24(5):627-638, 2009 (AHRQ grant HS10909).

    • Study documents the intergenerational nature of intimate partner violence.
      In this analysis of telephone interviews of 1,288 abused women in Seattle, WA, researchers found that children whose mothers saw domestic abuse during their childhoods were also at risk for witnessing abuse. Just over 56 percent of the women reported that their children had never seen domestic violence firsthand. However, because mothers were answering questions on their children's behalf, they could have been mistaken about what their child had or had not seen. The researchers note that mothers who witnessed abuse as children may view violence as normal and thus may not shield their children from it. Cannon, Bonomi, Anderson, and Rivara, Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 163(8):706-708, 2009 (AHRQ HS10909).

    • Violence and sexual abuse in childhood are linked to a higher risk for sexually transmitted infections in women.
      These researchers investigated how different forms of violence experienced by women across the lifespan are associated with sexually transmitted infections (STI). They found that having an STI was associated with experiencing both childhood sexual abuse and intimate partner violence. Women who experienced both types of violence were much more likely to have been diagnosed with an STI during their current relationship than women who had not suffered abuse. Williams, Larsen, McCloskey, Violence Vict 35(6):787-798, 2011 (AHRQ grant HS11088).

    • Women who suffer abuse are more likely than those who have never been abused to use mental health services.
      Researchers surveyed 3,333 women aged 18 to 64 in the Pacific Northwest and found that mental health service use was highest when the physical or emotional abuse was ongoing. However, women who had experienced abuse recently (within 5 years) or remotely (more than 5 years ago) still accessed mental health services at higher rates than women who were never abused. Women who were physically abused also used more emergency, outpatient, pharmacy, and specialty services. Women who were experiencing ongoing physical abuse had annual health care costs that were 42 percent higher than women who never suffered abuse. Bonomi, Anderson, Rivara, and Thompson, Health Serv Res 44(3):1-16, 2009. See also Bonomi, Anderson, Rivara, et al., J Gen Intern Med 23(3):294-299, 2008 (AHRQ grant HS10909).

    • Abused women are more likely to rely on condoms than pills for birth control.
      A survey of 25 women in the Boston, MA, area found that a high rate of women who were victims of domestic violence did not use any form of birth control. Of the 115 women who reported being abused in the past year, 17 percent did not use birth control, compared with 11 percent of the women who were not abused. Abused women most often used condoms (33 percent) to prevent pregnancy, while women who were not abused most often used birth control pills (46 percent). Williams, Larsen, and McCloskey, Violence Against Women 14(12):1382-1396, 2008 (AHRQ grant HS11088).

    • Duration and severity of domestic abuse predict whether women will seek medical and legal help.
      Researchers in Seattle conducted phone interviews with 1,509 women who said they had experienced physical, sexual, or psychological abuse since reaching the age of 18. Those who were sexually or physically abused were more likely to seek medical care and legal assistance than those who reported only psychological abuse. The longer the abuse had continued, the more likely the woman was to seek help. Women who were psychologically abused were more inclined to seek legal assistance rather than medical services. Duterte, Bonomi, Kernic, et al., J Womens Health 17(1):85-95, 2008 (AHRQ grant HS10909).

    • Hispanic women who are abused while pregnant report high levels of stress.
      Researchers surveyed 210 pregnant Latinas in Los Angeles in 2003-2004 to assess intimate partner violence, adverse social behavior, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and other life situations. Nearly half (44 percent) of the women reported abuse and high levels of social undermining by their partners (criticism, anger, insults) and stress. Women who were abused were more likely to be depressed (41.3 percent) or to have PTSD (16.3 percent) compared with women who were not abused (18.6 percent and 7.6 percent, respectively). Rodriguez, Heilemann, Fielder, et al., Ann Fam Med 6(1):44-52, 2008 (AHRQ grant HS11104).

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  • The Division of Violence Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) monitors the incidence, prevalence, and costs of partner and sexual violence (e.g., National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey; NISVS) and conducts research on the factors that increase or decrease the likelihood of perpetrating partner or sexual violence, and on the effectiveness, adoption, and dissemination of partner and sexual violence prevention programs (e.g. current or recent randomized controlled trials include Green Dot, Second Step, Coaching Boys into Men, Dating Matters, Safe Dates, and Screening and referral for partner violence). CDC also helps strengthen capacity in communities to address partner and sexual violence by helping state and non-governmental partners plan, implement, and evaluate primary prevention programs. For example, through the Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancement and Leadership Through Alliances (DELTA) program CDC funds state domestic violence coalitions to strengthen their capacity to prevent partner violence before it occurs and through the Rape Prevention and Education Program (RPE), CDC funds state health departments to work with Sexual Violence Coalitions to prevent sexual violence before it occurs and to build their capacity to evaluate their efforts.

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Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  • The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is the primary Federal agency for improving access to health care services for people who are uninsured, isolated or medically vulnerable. HRSA's strategic goals are to: 1) improve access to quality health care and services; 2) strengthen the health workforce; 3) build healthy communities; and 4) improve health equity.
  • Office of Women's Health HRSA OWH collaborates with Bureaus and Offices to address violence prevention through the HRSA Women's Health Coordinating Committee Violence Prevention Workgroup. The workgroup's priorities for 2013 included coordinating activities and events during violence prevention-related health observances and disseminating available resources to HRSA employees, grantees and networks via webinars archived and available on the HRSA OWH website. In addition, the WHCC VPW updated the HRSA Workplace Violence Prevention policy and included an annual training requirement to enhance awareness and capacity in support of a safe and respectful work environment, free of violence, for all employees.
  • Maternal and Child Health Bureau
    • Women's Health USA, an annual HRSA publication, is an easy-to-use collection of current and historical data related to the most pressing health challenges facing women, families, and communities. The 2012 edition of the data book highlighted several new topics including adverse childhood experiences and sexual violence.

    • A Comprehensive Approach for Community-Based Programs to Address Intimate Partner Violence and Perinatal Depression (PDF, 4.6 MB), Published January 2013.

    • Prenatal Risk Overview (PRO), HRSA Maternal and Child Health Bureau, and The Twin Cities Healthy Start site developed a web-based screening tool for pregnant women called Prenatal Risk Overview (PRO). This tool was originally developed for the Twin Cities Healthy Start program and is now available at no cost to health care and social service agencies and other institutions that serve pregnant women. The PRO screens pregnant women for psychosocial risk factors that may affect a healthy pregnancy or birth or impede a woman's ability to comply with prenatal care recommendations. The PRO was developed by the Minneapolis Health Department, originally for the health care clinics and social service agencies that served as Twin Cities Healthy Start program sites. It is now available at no cost to any registered user. The PRO screens for 15 risk domains addressing basic needs, social support, interpersonal violence, mental health, substance use, legal problems, and child protection services involvement, and categorizes risk levels as low, moderate, or high.

    • Project Connect: A partnership between the Office on Women's Health (OWH) and Futures Without Violence, Project Connect provides funding to improve the health and safety of women and children. Project Connect encourages states to use The Reproductive Health Clinical Guidelines, particularly the safety card which appears on page 21 of the guidelines (PDF, 11.1 MB)

    • HITS: A Short Domestic Violence Screening Tool for Use in a Family Practice Setting
      HITS is copyrighted in 2003 by Kevin Sherin MD, MPH. (PDF, 26 KB)
  • Bureau of Health Professions
    • The AVDR (Ask, Validate, Document, and Refer) approach was developed into a CD-ROM training program for dentists at UCSF through an NIH grant and it has been used in a number of training programs in the US. The approach used at NOVA South Eastern (former HRSA grantee) and lessons learned are detailed in the October of 2012 issue of the Journal of Dental Education. Abel, Stephen, et al. "A collaboration to enhance oral health care for survivors of domestic violence: women's domestic violence shelters and Nova Southeastern University's College of Dental Medicine." Journal of dental education 76.10 (2012): 1334-1341.

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Indian Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  • 'Frequently Asked Questions' on the IHS Website. This page provides information on eligibility for medical care through IHS, including SANE/SAFE examinations.
  • The Office for Victims of Crime is pleased to announce the availability of Professional Development Scholarships to those attending Indian Health Service's (IHS) Sexual Assault Examiner Classroom Trainings and Clinical Skills Trainings. The program provides up to $1,000 for individuals seeking continuing education opportunities. The scholarship program is administered by the Office for Victims of Crime Training and Technical Assistance Center (OVC TTAC). OVC TTAC provides comprehensive quality training and technical assistance resources to victim service providers and other professionals.

    Scholarship awards are based on eligibility, are limited to available funds, and are processed in the order in which applications are received. Scholarships are nontransferable and can be used only for professional development related to an applicant's responsibilities for serving victims of crime. OVC TTAC must receive the completed Individual Professional Development Scholarship application and all application materials at least 45 calendar days prior to the event or the request will be rejected - NO EXCEPTIONS.

    For more information please use access the following website: Professional Development Scholarships
  • Tribal Forensic Healthcare
    Indian Health Service's (IHS) Sexual Assault Examiner Classroom Trainings and Clinical Skills Trainings schedule

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Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  • SAMHSA Technical assistance center dedicated to building awareness of trauma-informed care and promoting the implementation of trauma-informed practices in programs and services. NCTIC facilitates the adoption of trauma-informed environments in the delivery of a broad range of services including mental health, substance use, housing, vocational or employment support, domestic violence and victim assistance, and peer support.

    Program brief and TA resources also available for download at: http://nasmhpd.org/TA/NCTIC.aspx
  • Technical assistance products available for download from NCTIC include:
    • Engaging Women in Trauma-Informed Peer Support:
      A technical assistance document from the SAMHSA-funded National Center on Trauma-Informed Care designed to (1) help make trauma-informed peer support available to women who are trauma survivors; (2) serve as a resource on integrating trauma-informed principles into peer support relationships and into independent peer support groups, and (3) provide peer supporters-both male and female-with the understanding, tools, and resources to engage in culturally responsive, trauma-informed peer support relationships with women trauma survivors.

    • Creating a Trauma-Informed Criminal Justice System for Women
      A technical assistance white paper articulating strategies for developing trauma-informed approaches at each of the five "intercept" points at which women may come in contact with the criminal justice system, each of which offers an opportunity to begin recovery. (PDF, 1.3 MB)

    • Creating A Place Of Healing and Forgiveness: The Trauma-Informed Care Initiative at the Women's Community Correctional Center of Hawaii
      A case study brief outlining the implementation process, strategy and outcomes of the efforts of the Women's Community Correctional Center of Hawaii to be more responsive to the trauma-related needs of incarcerated women and to engage in the necessary organizational and workforce development processes to become a trauma-informed correctional facility. (PDF, 1 MB)
  • SAMHSA's National Center for Trauma-Informed Care
  • Established by SAMHSA in April 2009, and initially chaired by SAMHSA and Co-chaired by the Department of Labor, this inter-agency federal workgroup is committed to (1) building awareness and stimulating cross-agency action regarding women, girls, and trauma and (2) coordinating and promoting the development of policies and services among Federal agencies which effectively support women and girls affected by exposure to trauma.
  • SAMHSA Technical assistance center dedicated to building awareness of trauma-informed care and promoting the implementation of trauma-informed practices in programs and services. NCTIC facilitates the adoption of trauma-informed environments in the delivery of a broad range of services including mental health, substance use, housing, vocational or employment support, domestic violence and victim assistance, and peer support.
    Program brief and TA resources also available for download at: http://nasmhpd.org/TA/NCTIC.aspx
  • The Committee is currently chaired by the Department of Labor and Co-Chaired by SAMHSA, and encompasses over 34 Federal Agencies and Operating Divisions, including the DHHS, DoL, DoJ, HUD, DoD, the State Department, Dept. of Education, the VA, and the Peace Corps. In June 2011, June 2011 - released working draft Report of the Federal Partners Committee, which includes:
    • Highlights of the work of Federal Departments and Agencies to address the issues of Trauma for women and girls
    • Examples of partnerships and collaborations
    • Summary of the proceedings of the First Federal Roundtable and 2011 priorities for the Committee
  • An updated report of the Committee will be released in the next month, and will include agency updates and a report from the Second Federal Roundtable held in 2012. This report will also be available for download on the NIC web page.
  • SAMHSA Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPS)
  • SAMHSA TIP 51, "Substance Abuse Treatment: Addressing the Specific Needs of Women," assists treatment providers in offering treatment to adult women with substance use disorders. The guide reviews gender-specific research and best practices, such as common patterns of initiation of substance use among women and specific treatment issues and strategies.
  • You are invited to download a groundbreaking report, Trauma-informed Approaches: Federal Activities and Initiatives - the second and highly anticipated Working Document Report of the Federal Partners Committee on Women and Trauma. Completed on September 30, 2013, the report documents the projects, programs, and initiatives of more than three dozen federal agencies, departments, and offices-one of the largest interagency collaborations in federal government history. With agencies' commitment to implementing gender-responsive, trauma-informed approaches, this report addresses the growing national interest in this issue, the work of the Federal Partners Committee, and the specific progress that participating agencies have made over the past three years (2010-2013), since the Committee's publication of its first report in 2011. This new report, developed with support from SAMHSA's National Center for Trauma-Informed Care, clearly demonstrates the application of trauma-informed approaches across a wide range of settings and systems and encourages other governmental and nongovernmental agencies to implement a cross-sector, interagency, inter-systems' realization, recognition, and response to trauma.

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Secretary, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

  • Policy Brief: Screening for Domestic Violence in Health Care Settings
    In light of recent policy changes in support of domestic violence screening in health care settings, this policy brief presents the state of practice and research on this preventive service. The brief discusses reasons for screening in health care settings, the current prevalence of screening and reasons this prevalence is relatively low, existing evidence about screening, and next steps for ensuring that screening becomes an effective preventive service

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Secretary, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of Adolescent Health

  • The US Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS') Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) is dedicated to improving the health and well-being of adolescents to enable them to become healthy, productive adults.
  • First funded in 2010, OAH supports and evaluates evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention (TPP) programs and implements the Pregnancy Assistance Fund; coordinates HHS efforts related to adolescent health promotion and disease prevention; and communicates adolescent health information to health professionals and groups, those who serve youth, parents, grantees, and the general public. OAH is also the convener and catalyst for the development of a national adolescent health agenda. OAH's violence against women and girls prevention efforts include funding through the Pregnancy Assistance Fund to improve services for pregnant women who are victims of domestic violence; resources provided through the Pregnancy Assistance Fund Resource Center; and other, online resources.
  • Pregnancy Assistance Fund
    • On July 29, 2013, OAH announced the second cohort of the Pregnancy Assistance Fund (PAF) grantees. OAH administers the PAF, funded through the Affordable Care Act, to award competitive grants to States and Tribes to provide support services to expectant and parenting teens, women, fathers, and their families.

    • Specifically, with PAF funds, grantees conduct the following types of activities:

      1. Provide support for expectant and parenting students in institutions of higher education;
      2. Provide support for expectant and parenting teens, women, fathers, and their families in high schools and community service centers;
      3. Improve services for pregnant women who are victims of domestic violence, sexual violence, sexual assault, and stalking; and
      4. Increase public awareness and education of services available for pregnant and parenting teens, women, fathers, and their families.

    • The second cohort of PAF grantees includes 17 grantees for a 4-year period (8/1/2013 - 07/31/2017). The first PAF cohort included 17 grantees that were awarded in 2010 for a 3-year period. Several current grantees work directly to improve services for women who are victims of domestic violence, sexual violence, sexual assault, and stalking (Category 3).
  • Pregnancy Assistance Fund (PAF) Resource and Training Center
    • OAH manages the PAF Resource and Training Center which provides tools and resources to PAF grantees and other organizations working with expectant and parenting teens, women, fathers, and their families. The Resource and Training Center contains training, technical assistance, and skill-building information as well as guides, tips and resources, including information for those working in the area of teen dating violence and sexual assault, to build the capacity of organizations supporting expectant and parenting teens, women, fathers, and their families. This information can be viewed here.
  • OAH Online Resources
  • Talking with Teens
    • The Talking with Teens section of the OAH website provides parents (and foster parents, guardians, and other parenting and caring adults) tips for getting the conversation started with their adolescents on sensitive topics including healthy relationships and dating violence.
  • Healthy Relationships Resources
  • Adolescent Healthy Relationships Facts on the state level and the national level are available including:
    • The percent of high school students who have ever had sexual intercourse,
    • The percent of high school students who were hit, slapped, or physically hurt on purpose by their boyfriend or girlfriend, and
    • The percent of high school students who were ever physically forced to have sexual intercourse when they did not want to.
  • OAH activities in conjunction with February Teen Violence Prevention Month:
    • The February 2012 OAH E-Update, (a monthly electronic update, sent to over 44,000 people, that contains key information and resources about different adolescent health topics), was dedicated to teen dating violence, highlighting teen dating violence resources and information about the prevention of teen dating violence.

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National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice

  • You are invited to download a groundbreaking report, Trauma-informed Approaches: Federal Activities and Initiatives - the second and highly anticipated Working Document Report of the Federal Partners Committee on Women and Trauma. Completed on September 30, 2013, the report documents the projects, programs, and initiatives of more than three dozen federal agencies, departments, and offices-one of the largest interagency collaborations in federal government history. With agencies' commitment to implementing gender-responsive, trauma-informed approaches, this report addresses the growing national interest in this issue, the work of the Federal Partners Committee, and the specific progress that participating agencies have made over the past three years (2010-2013), since the Committee's publication of its first report in 2011. This new report, developed with support from SAMHSA's National Center for Trauma-Informed Care, clearly demonstrates the application of trauma-informed approaches across a wide range of settings and systems and encourages other governmental and nongovernmental agencies to implement a cross-sector, interagency, inter-systems' realization, recognition, and response to trauma.

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U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP)

  • The U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) serves as the chair (with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration [SAMHSA]'s Center for Mental Health Services as co-chair) of the Women and Trauma Federal Partners' Committee-an interagency committee composed of more than 30 agencies and more than 80 members. In September 2013, this Committee will publish its second report: Trauma-informed Approaches: Federal Activities and Initiatives Federal Partners Committee on Women and Trauma, Working Document, 2nd Report. It documents more than 20 federal agencies' submissions with each agency highlighting the impact of trauma, how a trauma-informed approach can make a difference, major accomplishments from 2010-2013, new directions and collaborations, and additional resources related to each agency's projects and initiatives. To read a copy of this Committee's first report, see: http://nicic.gov/Library/025082
  • The Women & Trauma Federal Partners' Committee plans a webinar series to be launched in the fall of 2013. The platform provided by one of the partner agencies will support more than 1,000 participants. The first webinar will provide an overview of the Committee's work from the two co-chairs (ODEP & SAMHSA) and will feature one of the successful outcomes of one of the partner agencies--the Peace Corps--which revised its training curriculum to provide a trauma-informed approach. Other webinars will focus on how to implement a trauma-informed workplace and the intersection of substance abuse, mental health, and trauma, among others.

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Last updated: 24 April 2014    First published: 13 September 2013
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